The Old Hundredth Psalm Tune (All People That On Earth Do Dwell) - Vocal Score

Books | SATB, Unison Voice, Organ Accompaniment

Format: Sheet Music | Vocal Work
Alternatively known as All People That On Earth Do Dwell, this piece has been arranged by Ralph Vaughan Williams. This version was composed for the Coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second in Westminster Abbey on Tuesday 2nd June 1953.
ISBN: 9780193535084
Skill Level: Intermediate Explain this
Published on: 21 May 1953
No of pages: 6
Language: English
Catalogue No: N3508
 
     
       

        Musicroom Reviews

        Rating
        Review
        5
        For a special church service this takes some beating, though it really needs the 3 trumpets to be truly effective (timpani optional - nice, but not necessary). With 2 choir only verses (one unaccompanied with trumpet descant, one faux bourdon) it allows them to shine. The combined forces make this a truly wonderful opening or closing item. Highly recommended.
        Anonymous - (Hawick, United Kingdom)
        5
        Good quality production, easily readable.
        Anonymous - (Malton, United Kingdom)
        4
        I had to scale down this work for our Diamond Jubilee service so I purchased this edition of the excellent RVW arrangement of the Old 100th. It worked and verses 3 & 4 were singled out as particularly effective - this includes a trumpet descant. If you find the musicians, use the version scored for organ, choir, three trumpets and timpani - memorable and worthy of five stars!
        Anonymous - (Alton, United Kingdom)
        5
        A nicely presented short score of the splendid RWV setting, delivered very promptly.
        Anonymous - (Seaford, United Kingdom)
        5
        I have no hesitation in awarding 5 stars. The trumpet introduction makes the piece ideal for the start of a ceremonial occasion. The musical arrangement of every verse is in significant contrast to the preceding one. The ending is frankly majestic and inspirational. A rapport with the audience is instantly established, with the well spaced out opportunities for their involvement. Above all, the whole arrangement is comfortably achievable by most four-part choirs.
        Anonymous - (Ringwood, United Kingdom)

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