Philip Glass: 'Trilogy' Sonata For Piano

Books | Piano

Publisher: Chester Music
Artist: Philip Glass
Format: Sheet Music | Instrumental Album
The first performance of the Trilogy Sonata was given by the arranger and pianist Paul Barnes on 19 April 2001. The Sonata consists of transcriptions from the trilogy of 'portrait' operas by Philip Glass. Einstein on the Beach (1976), Satyagraha (1980), and Akhnaten (1984). Suitable for advanced pianists.
ISBN: 9780711991415
Published on: 14 November 2001
No of pages: 24
Language: English
Catalogue No: DU10439
 
     
       

        Frequently bought together

        Price for both - £17.90

        Philip Glass: 'Trilogy' Sonata For Piano reviews verified by reevooReevoo

        Quality of content
        10.0
        Value for money
        8.0
        Overall rating
        9.0
        Scores 9.0 out of 10 based on 1 review
        9 out of 10

        Jonathan

        Dortmund GB
        +
        It's Philip Glass music and I enjoy it.
        Well I guess if you don't like Glass it might not be much fun....
        Confirmed purchase: 24 February 2014
        Published on: 21 June 2014

        Musicroom Reviews

        Rating
        Review
        5
        Philips Glass’s Trilogy Sonata consists of transcriptions from his operas “Einstein on the Beach”, “Satyagraha” and “Akhnaten”. The works are arranged by the renowned Glass pianist Paul Barnes and are at the same time beautifully simple, and deceptively difficult. “Knee play”, probably the easiest technically out of the movements, with its alternating triplets/straight rhythms opens the work before leading into the beautiful “Satyagraha”. This second movement is bound to become immensely popular and anyone familiar with the original version will know how beautiful it is. But this piano transcription is simply exquisite, but be warned – it may sound simple but it is finger achingly difficult to pull off. The last movement raises the stakes even further with the “Dance” from scene 3 of Akhnaten, where some serious technique is needed – in many ways reminds me of the difficulty of the Stravinsky piano transcriptions from Petrushka – another piece that’s a hand killer!! Minimalist music might sound simple but often hides behind some enormous technically and interpretive difficulties. If you are up for a challenge then this is a worthy and beautiful piece.
        Anonymous - (Norwich, United Kingdom)

        Recently Viewed