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Poul Ruders: Symphony No. 4: Orchestra

Vocal Score | Sheet Music and Books

COMPOSER: Poul Ruders
PUBLISHER: Edition Wilhelm Hansen
PRODUCT FORMAT: Vocal Score
Symphony No. 4 - an Organ Symphony (2008) by Poul Ruders . Organ part & reduced score: WH31186C Orch. parts are available on hire: hire@ewh.dk Preface / ProgrammeNote When introducing a large-scale symphonic work not only as a symphony, but as an organ symphony, it would be impossible not
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Specifications
Composer Poul Ruders
Publisher Edition Wilhelm Hansen
Product Format Vocal Score
Genre Classical
Year of Publication 2013
StylePeriodView Description Post 1901
ISBN 9788759820834
Instrumentation Orchestra
No. WH31186
Number of pages 146
Description

Symphony No. 4 - an Organ Symphony (2008) by Poul Ruders.

Organ part & reduced score: WH31186C

Orch. parts are available on hire: hire@ewh.dk

Preface / ProgrammeNote

When introducing a large-scale symphonic work not only as a symphony, but as an organ symphony, it would be impossible not to think of and perhaps compare it with Camille Saint-Saëns’s famousSYMPHONY NO. 3, popularly known as the Organ Symphony. Well, that is a risk I am prepared to take – and live with the consequences.
Saint-Saëns, however, listed his work as a symphony avec/with organ.Theorgan only appears in two out of the four sections of thepiece. In my symphony, the instrument plays a far more significant part and is featured in all four movements. But it is not a concerto for organ and orchestra, rather asymphony with organo obligato - a symphony with an organ part of a soloistic nature. So, an Organ Symphony it is.


The first movement, PRELUDE, is exactly that: a foreplay to what is in store for the rest ofthe symphony. It is slow (very slow!) and predominantly hushed: the organ and the orchestra wake up, side-by-side, getting to know one another.
The second movement, CORTÈGE, is a slowly moving processional andit evokes extreme solemnity and austerity. Later on, the music takes flight and the atmosphere lightens considerably, a far more playful music emerging.
This leads to the third movement, ETUDE, an exercise ininstrumental virtuosity and technical challenge.
The fourth and last movement is called CHACONNE, but I could just as well have named it passacaglia (the definition of those two terms seems to blur, even among thelearned). Bearing in mind the last movement of Johannes Brahms´s SYMPHONY NO.
4, which is universally agreed on as being a passacaglia, I chose to avoid the Wrath of the Gods and opted for

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