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Philip Sparke: The Green Hills of Tyrol: Baritone Or Euphonium And Accomp.

Air Varié for Euphonium and Piano

COMPOSER: Philip Sparke
PUBLISHER: Anglo Music Press
INSTRUMENTATION: Bb Euphonium and Piano
PRODUCT FORMAT: Instrumental Work
The Green Hills of Tyrol was commissioned by Jrena and Beat Knüsel for their son, Swiss euphonium player Joel Knüsel, to celebrate his 20th birthday in 2019. The request was for a piece suitable for use in a solo competition, possibly using a Scottish or Irish melody, and composer Philip Sparke
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Specifications
Composer Philip Sparke
Publisher Anglo Music Press
Instrumentation Bb Euphonium and Piano
Grade of Difficulty ADVANCED
Number of pages 20
Language E(US)DFN
Product Format Instrumental Work
Description Product Type Book and Part(s)
Genre Solo & Concerto
Year of Publication 2022
ISBN 9789043164603
ISMN 9790570710829
Series Anglo Instrumental series
No. AMP 504-401
Product Dimensions 30,5 x 22,9 cm
Text language Dutch;English;French;German
Description
The Green Hills of Tyrol was commissioned by Jrena and Beat Knüsel for their son, Swiss euphonium player Joel Knüsel, to celebrate his 20th birthday in 2019. The request was for a piece suitable for use in a solo competition, possibly using a Scottish or Irish melody, and composer Philip Sparke suggested an ‘old-fashioned’ air varie might be a suitable idea. The piece follows the well-established formula of a theme followed by four variations. The history of the original melody is fascinating and, although it is now well-known as a bagpipe tune, its background is Austrian or Italian, rather than Scottish. The tune appears as a chorus of Swiss soldiers in Rossini’s 1829 opera William Tell but was possibly an existing Tyrolean folk tune. In 1854, during the Crimean War, Pipe Major John MacLeod of the 93rd Highlanders heard a band of the Sardinian contingent playing selections from the opera in camp before the Siege of Sebastopol. He was struck by the melody and arranged it for his pipers, calling it The Green Hills of Tyrol, referring to Tell’s visit to that corner of Austria in the opera. It has since become universally popular among pipe bands who usually refer to it as A Scottish Soldier, following the addition of new lyrics in a 1961 hit by Andy Stewart.
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