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Giacomo Puccini: Madame Butterfly: Mixed Choir And Ensemble

Score | Sheet Music and Books

COMPOSER: Giacomo Puccini
PUBLISHER: Ricordi
PRODUCT FORMAT: Score
Madama Butterfly took wing under turbulent circumstances. The premiere (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 17 February 1904) was a disaster, while a second production only months later (Brescia, Teatro Grande, 28 May 1904) was instead a resounding success. Inthe intervening period the composer had made
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Specifications
Composer Giacomo Puccini
Publisher Ricordi
Product Format Score
Genre Opera / Operette
Year of Publication 1999
ISBN 9780634019449
ISMN 9790041913537
Instrumentation Mixed Choir And Ensemble
No. PR 00135300
Number of pages 493
Voicing Double Choir
Description
Madama Butterfly took wing under turbulent circumstances. The premiere (Milan, Teatro alla Scala, 17 February 1904) was a disaster, while a second production only months later (Brescia, Teatro Grande, 28 May 1904) was instead a resounding success. Inthe intervening period the composer had made considerable changes to the score, enough that the result qualifies as a “second version”. Still other changes were to come, however, as the opera toured in successive productions. The definitive version,which is reflected in this edition, was produced in 1906 at the Opéra Comique in Paris and published by Ricordi the following year. Puccini thus invested considerable effort into the creation of his favorite opera and into shaping the fate of theheroine, herself a manifestation of the extremes of patient waiting and steadfast love. The music is a complete and masterful expression of the pity and disillusionment that surround the figure of Cio-Cio-San: her absolute but misguided hope, herpathetic pretence in the name of love, her miserable demise.
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