MPs turn talents to choir singing

Musicroom April 5, 2012 0
MPs turn talents to choir singing

Parliament is best-known for the cross-party bickering and intense debates that make our evening news bulletins. Few people, though, will be aware of the Parliament Choir, which is currently putting the finishing touches to the songs it is set to perform at its Cadogan Hall concert later this month.

The group is comprised of singers with different political allegiances, yet they are able to put their opinions to one side for the sake of the choir, which hosts regular rehearsal sessions at the Palace of Westminster.

“I think it captures the enormity of the responsibility of Parliament, when the members undertake to act wisely and justly each day,” commented conductor Simon Over.

The Parliament Choir was first created more than a decade ago and has since developed a reputation for helping to foster good will between the different political parties.

“They can switch off from the pressures of politics and just concentrate on making music. They often say they had no idea music could be so life-changing and good for the soul,” Mr Over explained.

Nicholas O’Neill, the choir’s in-house composer, confirmed that the choir does not require anyone to audition, explaining that inexperienced or less capable MPs might be off joining were this the case.

“We like to think that those who can’t read music or are less confident will get swept along by those who are more accomplished,” he told the Daily Telegraph.

Consequently, the choir emits an enthusiastic, have-a-go vibe that sees them contradict the stereotype of dour politicians. Due to Parliamentary commitments, however, organisers can never be sure who is and isn’t going to turn up – which isn’t ideal, obviously.

Nevertheless, the group has survived for more than ten years and their appearance at Cadogan Hall on April 18th is another opportunity for the MPs to showcase their less well-publicised talents.